October 3, 2012 No Comments

Customer-Centric Business Model

To grow your business, you might need to adjust your business model. A business model is the structure, focus, and operational methodology of your business.

Business growth usually means paying more attention to customers. If you do not have a customer-centric business model that is tightly focused on attracting, delighting, and maintaining customers, you might want to make some changes so that it is. Depending on your industry, that concentration on meeting customers’ needs can result in exponential growth.

In software development, for example, a customer-centric business model means that no project is undertaken unless there is absolute certainty that there are customers clamoring for that software. Developing a software program just because it’s “cool” is not enough anymore. The market must clearly express a need or problem for which your product is the solution.

A Joint Application Development (JAD) model for software development involves every department of the company in the development process. There are regular cross-functional meetings where representatives from finance, HR, customer support, QA, marketing, sales, and development get together to plan, troubleshoot, and support the development of the product. In this way, each area of the company has a stake, and a vested interest, in the success of the project.

Also called an integrated business model, this way of working together to get, keep, and satisfy customers ensures strong customer loyalty and that there are no surprises for the company.

A customer-centric business model takes the focus off the product or service, and puts it squarely and continually on the customer. Remember, to build a better mouse trap, it’s not about making it better for the mouse, but making it much better for the customer who has a mouse problem.