How Much is Lost Productivity Costing You?

Usability and User Experience (UX) are hot topics in the product development sector right now. The concept is that if you improve design, workflow, and other user-facing aspects of your product, leading to a better user experience, you will increase customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, and predictably, revenue. This is something technical communicators have understood and been working on for along time. When customers buy more products, because their user experience is consistently good with products from that source, companies understand the health that brings to their bottom line. However, there is hidden value in improving product usability (how the product enables users to complete their tasks): productivity. When workers slow down, have to troubleshoot, have to call user support, can’t figure out how to complete their task, and need to consult documentation, they are losing productivity. When it takes multiple people to solve a software- or process-induced problem, that is productive time stolen from the business. If you think of a ballpark $100 per hour (wages, benefits, overhead, etc.) per employee, delays start to add up quickly. Poor products and processes can cost businesses tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. The more a system is mission critical…

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Key Customer Metrics for Growth

When I ask small business owners about their customers, I often get long pauses and even blank stares. Many business owners are so focused on their products or services that they forget to pay attention to their customer numbers. One of my first tasks is to shift that focus onto the customer. Without customers, there IS no business. Therefore, it is critical to every business to know precisely how they get and keep customers. There are three key metrics every business owner needs to know about those customers: Customer acquisition cost Conversion rate of prospects to customers Lifetime value of the customer

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Eliminate Barriers to Small Business Growth

In my analysis of the exotic furniture shop that felt it couldn’t compete with “the big boys”, I mentioned the concept of an “anti-USP”. This is any factor that works against your Unique Selling Proposition. Your USP is one of the most valuable aspects of your business. It clearly states why customers should choose to do business with you instead of your competitors, and it emphasizes the value you offer your customers. When you have any anti-USPs, however, all the good work you do in your business can be negated by one or more simple things. For the exotic furniture store, the used look of their furniture negated the value of these high-priced pieces. Sometimes even the business name can be an anti-USP, as in the case of a former client who had the word “Kwik” in his business name. That particular spelling of the word “quick” indicates a low-priced, lower value service so sets up a customer expectation that yes, they’ll get something fast, but it is going to be inexpensive. Sadly, that business owner’s services were not inexpensive at all. Potential customers who invited him to give them a quote got immediate sticker shock as the price far…

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